Seniors who have never strength trained before can easily and conveniently begin workouts and achieve dramatic results within the first few weeks.

Our Slow, Controlled Method Brings Quick Results to Seniors

As we age, our fitness needs change…Joints may become achy and less flexible, strength decreases and bones become more fragile. The 21 Minute Convenience Fitness program is on target with the requirements of Seniors.

A recent study in The Journal of Gerontology reported that…

“ Elderly men can not only tolerate very high weight training workloads, but will exhibit muscular changes similar to their younger counterparts. Even the gains for previously sedentary older folks can be dramatic.”

Our Personal Coaches Ensure Efficiency & Safety

The no sweat workout, done in your street clothes, with a coach supervising the entire workout ensures maximum efficiency and safety. Our medical grade equipment (not typically found in most health clubs) was specifically designed for a “slow”, high resistant training program that is easy on the joints and ligaments.

Seniors have unique exercise requirements (especially those who may have led a more sedentary lifestyle), and our equipment and weight training regimen do not involve any explosive or fast movements, which can lead to injury. In fact, landmark university studies have proven the effectiveness and safety of the slow, controlled strength training method on Seniors!

Why Begin a Strength Training Fitness Program?

  • In 2003, the Surgeon General stated for the first time that strength training should be at the core of any exercise program.
  • The American Council on Exercise (ACE) says there is a rising need for strength training for older adults to help fight osteoporosis, reduce the risk of injury and maintain independence
  • By 2020, the US Department of Health & Human Services predicts one in two Americans over 50 will be at risk for fractures from low bone mass
  • Approximately 18% of Seniors are diagnosed with Diabetes and this increase is linked to 2 factors: increase in fat and decrease in muscle

The Benefits of Strength Training for Seniors Are Now Scientific Fact…

A generation ago it was thought that Seniors could not grow lean muscle tissue.

Research has proven that weight training has helped people in their seventies, eighties and even nineties significantly improve the quality of their lives by increasing their muscle mass and strength. The impact on the functions of everyday living, such as climbing stairs, carrying packages and maintaining independence and health cannot be overlooked.

Reuters News Service reported on April 21, 2004 that…

“ Weight training (simple workouts, done consistently) can help women lose weight and keep it off, and can also help older men and women strengthen their immune systems, according to research presented at The Experimental Biology 2004 conference in Washington this week.”

I feel really good about my 21 Minute exercise regime…I can already see a difference in the way I walk up stairs and how fast I can walk. The 21 Minute coaches are really the reason I can see great results and push myself to the limit.

—Janet F., Retired Senior

I didn’t start exercising seriously until my early fifties and my research led me to the slow-momentum weight training program, which I did at home on my own. When I heard about 21 Minute Convenience Fitness, I knew it was exactly the program I had been looking for. I come to the studio wearing my dress pants, shirt and tie, leave the tie at the door and get to work. I really like the convenience, the extra stretching and I’m out of there in 30 minutes, instead of at least the hour it took at the gym.

—Steve S., Commercial Real Estate Broker

Several other benefits of weight training have been noted by many recent studies:

  • ACE also says there is a rising need for strength training for older adults to help fight osteoporosis, reduce the risk of injury and maintain independence
  • By 2020, the US Department of Health and Human Services predicts one in two Americans over 50 will be at risk for fractures from low bone mass
  • Approximately 18% of Seniors are diagnosed with Diabetes and this increase is linked to 2 factors: increase in fat and decrease in muscle

Articles for Seniors